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Moby-Dick Marathon, 2017

Poster Graphic text whale FLAT

2017 SPONSORS & DONORS

Check out our SILENT AUCTION ART!

FRIDAY, June 9:
11:00-12:15 p.m. begins at  Canio’s Books, Main Street
12:30- 3:45 p.m. Old Whaler’s Church, Union Street
4:00 – 10:00 p.m. Canio’s Books

SATURDAY, June 10:
10:00 – 1:50 p.m. Sag Harbor Whaling Museum, Main Street
2:00 – 5:50 p.m. John Jermain Memorial Library
6:00 – 10:00 p.m. Canio’s Books

SUNDAY, June 11:
11:00 – 1:15 p.m. Eastville Community & Historical Society, Hampton Street
1:30 – 4:00 p.m. reading concludes at Canio’s Books, and After-party follows.

Sponsor a Chapter!

Sponsor a Chapter and help support Canio’s Cultural Cafe.  Sponsors will be publicized at the event, in our program, and on our website.  Choose your level of support:

Ahab:  $100 receives a commemorative button
Ishmael:  $200 receives a commemorative button & t-shirt
Queequeg:  $300 receives a commemorative button, t-shirt, & Modern Library edition of Moby-Dick with Rockwell Kent illustrations
Starbuck:  $500 receives all of the above, plus commemorative poster
Melville:  $1000 receives all of the above, plus two seats in a two-hour cruise with Captain Anton Hagen aboard the Marlinspike.

To donate, pick a chapter, your level of support, and send an email to caniosculturalcafe at gmail.com with MDM Donor as subject.  Please include two alternate chapters in case your first choice has been selected.  Popular chapters go fast. Send your check to: Canio’s Cultural Cafe, 290 Main Street, Sag Harbor, NY 11963.

We thank you for you support!

Not the Last Picture Show

Just two weeks ago we went to see Moonlight at the Sag Harbor Cinema. We bought our tickets from the lovely lady in the little booth, got a bag of popcorn and grabbed a few of those small thin napkins neatly arrayed on the counter. We found our favorite seats, row five, center and settled into the chattering darkness. What a heartbreakingly beautiful film Moonlight is, and how further heartbreaking that Moonlight is the last film we saw at that historic movie house.

The facade’s been torn down after Friday’s fire, piles of black rubble carted away. A gaping dark hole in the street where dreams and fantasies once flickered on the screen. The Sag Harbor Cinema, lone independent movie house on the East End brave enough to show “art” films and “foreign” films, and films that challenged as even as they inspired us. The musty smell of the old seats, the banging pipes as  heat slowly seeped into that cavernous room are now nostalgic memories.

cinema-interior-post-fire

We hope they will rebuild. We’re sure other buildings damaged or destroyed will rise again Phoenix-like from the ashes. We’re thankful no one was injured. We are all so grateful to our heroic firefighters. How quickly our compassionate community pulled together to lend a hand. A friend described a fire as something that refines, or clarifies, I put in. Just what will be refined or clarified from this December 16 fire remains to be seen. But fundraising efforts are underway and Sag Harbor will rise again! The village has endured several  devastating fires from the time when villagers lit their lamps with whale oil to as recently as just a few years back. Please show your support for Main Street Sag Harbor, this holiday season and beyond.

*Photo taken the day after the fire. (c) Kathryn Szoka

Read, Connect, Act

What now? Friends are asking in the wake of the presidential election shocker last week. What we can offer to those questioning how we got here, is more of what we so believe in: the power of books to inform and inspire. The power of community to support and strengthen the insights gained. And action, a plan for creative sustaining ways forward, to apply what we’ve gained through reading, reflection, conversation.

To that end, Canio’s Cultural Cafe will again offer a series of community discussion courses focusing on environmental issues. This winter we’ll present inspiring, engaging material to read, discuss & act upon focused on environmental activism, living simply, sustainable energy, and more. Join us for an upcoming course. Now more than ever the planet requires your participation. Find out more by contacting the shop.

We’re grateful to organizations like Northwest Earth Institute for creating and promoting these courses, and to Orion Magazine for providing inspiring articles to engage the imagination, the heart and mind in our understanding of our responsibilities toward Earth.

 

Ferrante Fever

 IT’S HERE! #FerranteFever

ferrante

#4 of The Neapolitan Novels:  The Story of a Lost Child

Call to reserve a copy. Join us September 1, 5 p.m. for Prosecco, biscotti, and Ferrante Fever!

Canio’s in the New York Times

If you haven’t seen this yet, please read:

Canio's in the New York Times

Canio’s in the New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/23/nyregion/fighting-to-preserve-sag-harbors-literary-flavor.html?ref=nyregionspecial&_r=0

Be sure to stop in at Canio’s over the winter and help us “keep Sag Harbor’s literary light glowing!”

Canio’s, where good books, ideas, & community meet

CALENDAR of EVENTS

Welcome, Friends of Canio’s, to our “new”  look.  Canio’s has long been a pillar of Sag Harbor’s literary and artistic community with thousands of events over the years within our storied walls.  This October we celebrates our 34th year.  Stay tuned for details of the celebration. The summer of 2014 brings lots of exciting news.  Our calendar is full of events with local & well known writers; and other great events, including the jazz guitarist, Jack Wilkins on July 12.  Check out our listing.

Saving Bookstores, Saving Lives 

James Patterson is giving a million dollars to bookstores for specific projects. We need your help!   Please recommend Canio’s Books for a James Patterson Grant. Here’s how:  go to  jamespatterson.com/booksellers and answer a few questions. That’s it!   Let us know & we’ll keep you posted. Thanks in advance.

TEST our NEW e-book offering

Are you reading e-books on your iPad or iPhone?  If yes, please test our e-book storefront on ZOLA Books. ZOLA is an online e-book purveyor for small Indies. They are building their inventory and have signed many publishers. They don’t carry Random House-Penguin title yet; but this will change soon. In the meantime, give it a try. We’d love your feedback.  

 

It’s simple:   

go to zolabooks.com/profile/caniosbooks,

CLICK the IndiePledge button on our page.  All your purchases will be credited to Canio’s once you make the pledge.

Maryann & Kathryn are offering writing & photography workshops throughout the summer.  Please call or email for information.  Private lessons and editorial services are also available.  Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, but most importantly, come in & see us and discover why Canio’s is where good books, ideas & community meet.

Big Community Hug

Canio's Cash Mob by SzokaThanks to all cash-mobbers who jammed into Canio’s last Saturday in a huge show of support for our efforts to be your community bookshop. It was a record-breaking day at the shop thanks to friends Bobbi, Eric, April, Eric and many others who contacted friends and spread the word and showed up to give us what felt like a great big hug.
We put a lot of energy into creating an interesting, thought-provoking shop filled with books worth reading, and artists and writers worth meeting. We felt affirmed in our efforts this past Saturday, when the community responded with a resounding, “Yes!” Sag Harbor’s long literary legacy continues!
And we say, “Thank you!” to all who participated. And please do come again. Canio’s is Canio’s because of this wonderful community we all live in and love, and because of people like you.

A Stone for Nina

One of the truly remarkable experiences we’ve had here recently was a reading by Paul Genega of his short prose piece, A Stone For Nina. An elegy really, the story describes a fascinating and unusual older woman who befriends a group of naive but intelligent college boys. It’s the late ’60s Washington, D.C. Nina has a long tale to tell about her life, full of strange twists and turns and possible fabrications. She captures the heart and imagination of our narrator, a sensitive and perceptive soul. Author and poet Paul Genega’s reading of this piece joined voice, cadence, word, and physical gesture all in subtle and expressive alignment. It was as if all the many disparate elements of a life harmonized in the work of this artist, writer Paul Genega.

In fact, Stone for Nina is such an impressive work, I’ve decided to devote an entire writing workshop to the piece. We will read and closely examine the piece, and use it as inspiration for our own long loving look at character, memory and storytelling. Contact the shop for details about this summer workshop, “Character, Memory and the Long Short Story”.

We were delighted that Paul’s proud father, in his nineties, was able to attend the event and share in the accomplishment of his son.
Editor, publisher and poet Antje Katcher also read from her new poetry collection, For Bananafish, a  collection of recent work, sestinas and haikus that demonstrate strict adherence to form combined with surprising flights of  imagination. Both works are published by Three Mile Harbor Press. Signed copies are available at Canio’s.

Steinbeck Slept Here!

Today, February 27,  is John Steinbeck’s birthday as noted, thoughtfully, but incompletely by Garrison Keillor on The Writer’s Almanac. (http://app.info.americanpublicmediagroup.org/e/es?s=1715082578&e=9333&elq=daf1cddcd35f43fa88e5fe39e05aa6ae)

We must add that Steinbeck lived, worked, fished, drank and generally had a good time here in Sag Harbor on the East End of Long Island. Some have called ours a “charming fishing village” not dissimilar to Steinbeck’s beloved Monterey Bay. Steinbeck spent the last decade of his life here, driving out from New York when his works were performed on Broadway stages.

We see a steady stream of  Steinbeck fans on pilgrimage who stop in to ask about where he lived — The writer’s home is now a private residence overlooking Sag Harbor Cove.  Our literary walking tours always wind up there, a respectful distance from the place he wrote The Winter of Our Discontent. It’s said he based several characters on Sag Harbor locals. Steinbeck’s American road book, Travels with Charley begins here in the wind-churned cove, just as Hurricane Donna blows through:”Under the big oak trees of my place at Sag Harbor sat Rocinante…”

John found pals among the locals, fishing buddies and drinking buddies in the days of the notorious Black Buoy bar when Sag Harbor was a place God-fearing mothers forbade their kids from venturing to. But local folks just let Steinbeck be Steinbeck, allowed him his privacy.  In a show of affection for what was then a proudly blue-collar town, Steinbeck helped create our Whalers festival, a giant street parade and rowdy weekend party featuring boat races that once brought sailors and boozers from far and near. The festival, now toned down as Sag Harbor has gone upscale,  is celebrated as HarborFest,  in early September when the crowds have dissipated, but when the weather’s still fine.

Steinbeck conducted his war with the ospreys here, as described in a humorous piece we included in our Sag Harbor Is: A Literary Celebration.  At the centenary of his birth, we hosted a Steinbeck celebration with an exhibit of photographs from the family collection and a stirring tribute by Steinbeck’s friend, the late Budd Schulberg. There’s a beautiful bronze bust of the writer in our beloved John Jermain Library, a tribute to the village’s claim on the Nobel Prize winner.

All this to say, Steinbeck once slept here! He lived here, played here, wrote here. Happy Birthday, John Steinbeck. Sag Harbor salutes you!

Keep It Simple

Stacks of books and boxes, piles of paper, catalogs, bills surround us. Call it clutter, or call it cozy lived-in. We’ve got lots of “stuff” here at the bookshop, most of it important, but some of it could go.  So we’re eager to start another community discussion course  this month called Voluntary Simplicity. We’ll address not just physical clutter, but personal as well as environmental clutter.

Call it ironic that here in the fabulous Hamptons a sandbar of conspicuous consumption, a small group of folks will gather to discuss how to get more out of life with less.

In 1981 Duane Elgin’s book, Voluntary Simplicity: Toward a Way of Life That is Outwardly Simple, Inwardly Rich  announced the movement.  Reissued in 2010, Voluntary Simplicity has become even more relevant, mainstream rather than marginal,  more urgent. According to Elgin, voluntary simplicity helps create community through a common purpose; protects plants and animals from extinction;  promotes self-discovery and well-being among humans, all the while promoting a balanced use of Earth’s precious resources. In fact, voluntary simplicity is crucial to a sustainable future.

Voluntary Simplicity, a five-week course designed by the Northwest Earth Institute, begins at Canio’s Tuesday, January 29. We’ll read intriguing articles, discuss our experiences, as we become more aware of how we’re spending our precious time, our limited resources. We’ll discover how these choices affect our health, our relationships, and Earth.

Pre-registration is required along with a $30. materials fee. Space is limited; contact us soon! The program is sponsored by Canio’s Cultural Cafe.


Canio’s Books is located at 290 Main Street, Sag Harbor, NY 11963, 63.725.4926. Call or email us, caniosbooks@verizon.net. While we love you to SEE you, you can also order new titles at our online storefront or some of our second hand inventory HERE. Thanks for visiting!

Vanishing Landscapes